Sun Tzu – The Art Of War

Sun Tzu is credited as the author of The Art of War, an influential work of military strategy that has inspired both Western and East Asian philosophy of combat. Sun Tzu’s methodology is foundational in the creation of Internal Martial Arts.

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Father of Close Combat : HK01 Hong Kong News Portal 03-2020

[Special Thanks to HK01 Hong Kong News for the honorable mention of IRFS in the March 2020 edition] An excellent article on the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting Knife and “Father of Close Combat”- ‘William Fairbairn used to practice a variety of martial arts, and finally merged

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Lung Strength and Capacity – The Lion System

Practitioners of Yin Style in the past were not only fighters, but physicians with profound knowledge of complex human anatomy.  It has been stated long ago, that the Lion posture strengthens the lungs and respiratory response more so than the other systems. “Simple arm elevation

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Fencing Lunge – Dragon Biomechanics

Neuromuscular coordination of the Dragon System- develops magnitudes of forward linear velocity from the body’s center of mass and weapon. It’s biomechanical frame and footwork generate explosive power, similar to modern fencers.  As an example, fencers thrust their weapon quickly toward their opponent, exhibiting explosive

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Stress Response – Vestibular Function

More times than not… the stress response is activated during modern Kungfu vs MMA challenges and goes into overdrive anytime popular kungfu interpretation examines its own feudal history (the one that is not reimagined/approved by the Chinese State Commission for Physical Culture and Sports). Elevated

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Lost Tiger Fork – Yin Style Baguazhang

The Tiger Fork/Palladium is standard equipment of Imperial Guards during the Ming and Qing Dynasties- the melee cold weapon is often used in tiger hunts, military, and law enforcement applications. The Tiger Fork remains a versatile tool to this day in Asia, still utilized by

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Dragon Carrying Strike – Miao Dao

In the 19th century, armed and unarmed methods are often trained within the Four Point footwork pattern of Yin Style Baguazhang. The same is true for other close fighting systems of that era, such as Savate in the Anglo/French divisions. The YSB Dragon Carrying methods

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Swimming Body Baguazhang – Qing Big Saber

Baguazhang, regardless of branch, is known for practicing with extremely large weapons. The Big Broadsword is the most iconic, yet often it is portrayed as the giant Oxtail Saber in modern schools. The famous Big Saber, in truth, is the military Pudao/Halberd of the Qing

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Pure Wrestling vs Wrestling with Weapons Integration

Contrary to popular opinion, the Interlinking/ Weaving routines of Baguazhang as popularized in mainstream and films, contain ‘wrestling with weapons integration’ and not pure empty-hand wrestling. Grappling and takedowns with the instrument in hand, are crucial in feudal melee- often against armed opponents. It is

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