Fencing Lunge – Dragon Biomechanics

Neuromuscular coordination of the Dragon System- develops magnitudes of forward linear velocity from the body’s center of mass and weapon. It’s biomechanical frame and footwork generate explosive power, similar to modern fencers.  As an example, fencers thrust their weapon quickly toward their opponent, exhibiting explosive extension of the rear leg to perform a powerful forward lunge. Elite features of Dragon body mechanics benefit sequential coordination of upper and lower limb movements during fight or flight, with efficient patterns of muscle activation.

Stress Response – Vestibular Function

More times than not… the stress response is activated during modern Kungfu vs MMA challenges and goes into overdrive anytime popular kungfu interpretation examines its own feudal history (the one that is not reimagined/approved by the Chinese State Commission for Physical Culture and Sports). Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction- overwhelming dizziness and loss of balance are common in kungfu practitioners with panic and other anxiety disorders. A stressed-out vestibular system may induce fear of movement, the feeling of insecurity in a fight, and unbalanced emotions in the context of proper historical documentation. Extensive circle walking and feudal insight harmonize the interaction between stress and vestibular compensation.

Lost Tiger Fork – Yin Style Baguazhang

The Tiger Fork/Palladium is standard equipment of Imperial Guards during the Ming and Qing Dynasties- the melee cold weapon is often used in tiger hunts, military, and law enforcement applications. The Tiger Fork remains a versatile tool to this day in Asia, still utilized by armed police for control and capture. The modern fork is more humane with only two rounded prongs- the sharp center point is removed entirely. [feudal Tiger Fork technique is contained in Yin Style Bagua, most apparent in the Rooster System]

Dragon Carrying Strike – Miao Dao

In the 19th century, armed and unarmed methods are often trained within the Four Point footwork pattern of Yin Style Baguazhang. The same is true for other close fighting systems of that era, such as Savate in the Anglo/French divisions. The YSB Dragon Carrying methods contain not only wrestling and control tactics- the Miao Dao strategy is apparent. Dragon is known for its ‘Long’ internal force and rotations which in turn, complements the long saber. The weapons work pre- 1928 Reform were direct, precise, and advantageous.

Swimming Body Baguazhang – Qing Big Saber


Baguazhang, regardless of branch, is known for practicing with extremely large weapons. The Big Broadsword is the most iconic, yet often it is portrayed as the giant Oxtail Saber in modern schools. The famous Big Saber, in truth, is the military Pudao/Halberd of the Qing Dynasty. Yin Fu’s son Yin Yu Zhang represented large saber in his book ‘Practice Methods For Cleaving Saber Techniques’ in 1933. The cleaving saber in feudal times is attached to a wooden staff (true Big Saber) for patrol duties, allowing for versatility and longer reach. The westernization movement in the mid 19th century gave rise to the popularity of bayonets and refined pistols.  Modernized/compact carry of the cleaving blade portion separate from the wooden staff became standard. The ‘Swimming Body’ style of Baguazhang caters directly to the Pudao/Halberd in conjunction with close-in wrestling tactics of Qing era bodyguards- it is unfortunate many have forgotten the original context. The Men Baozhen/ Xie Peiqi branch has always viewed the ‘Swimming Body’ method as a subsystem of the Yin Style Bagua Dragon System.

Pure Wrestling vs Wrestling with Weapons Integration

Contrary to popular opinion, the Interlinking/ Weaving routines of Baguazhang as popularized in mainstream and films, contain ‘wrestling with weapons integration’ and not pure empty-hand wrestling. Grappling and takedowns with the instrument in hand, are crucial in feudal melee- often against armed opponents. It is worth noting the forms/drilling methods of Qing-era wrestling are often distinct in aesthetics from the silky/ twisting/ turning style of Swimming Baguazhang. 

Dragon Cavalry – Napoleonic Era

Dong Haichuan’s Baguazhang is renown for deceptive hands.  Yin Fu’s occupation as an imperial guard often required reconnaissance applications similar to the Napoleonic counterpart. A high-level fight IQ on the ground or the horse is essential to success.