The Soul Of Baguazhang – Ming Dynasty Sword Classics

In modern Baguazhang schools, the Giant Sword and Saber is often emphasized, regardless of branch or styles. In fact, many instructors today regard the sword as the soul of Baguazhang structures, in feudal times… While this theory certainly has merit, Feudal Academia is not here to play guessing games. 10 out of 10 Chinese scholars agree that the cold weapon technology of the Qing Dynasty is inherited directly from the Ming.  IRFS provides clear documentation, tracking the longsword foundation to Yu Dazhao in the era of General Qijiguang. Yu Dazhao wrote a book called “The Sword Classic”:  the techniques illustrated include the iconic  T-step/shape footwork entries of triangular point-stepping, describes the sword method as ‘running water’, a continuous striking which ‘flows with the force’, demonstrates ‘reversing the body’ and ‘heaven and earth’ usage of the longsword… last and most importantly, THE SWORD CLASSIC IS A BOOK ABOUT STICKS [aka polearms] FOR PIKEMAN OF THE ARMY!!

Dong Haichuan – KarateBender

In contemporary times with kungfu commercialization, historically accurate Baguazhang is a challenge to identify. Every now and again, someone will ponder why the Men Baozhen/ Xie Peiqi branch of Yin Style Baguazhang ‘aesthetically’ varies from mainstream Baguazhang. Some have suggested Yin Style Hard Palm looks more like KARATE then airbending as commonly depicted in the movies. The feudal breakdown by Chinese scholars can finally put this question to rest…  Karate stems from “Tang Hand”, a system which was further refined in the 19th century through the efforts of Tangshou Sakugawa.  At that time, Sakuhisa Kakuhe traveled across the ocean to study Chinese martial arts in the Qing Dynasty- improving upon the earlier Ming Dynasty “Tang Hand” rooted in Ryukyu. Sakugawa’s Beijing foundation is often credited to Dong Haichuan, the founder of Baguazhang. Sakujiu’s stick method is influenced by his military studies in Beijing City during this era.

Baguazhang Integration – Sanda 1980

Sanda Academies in China are the foundation for the majority of Chinese MMA fighters- the modern debate of “Traditional” vs modern combat sports is often out of context, lacking proper historical knowledge. Modern Sanda development in the late 20th century is primarily feudal Shaolin legwork, Baguazhang wrestling, with western Boxing fusion. Before the ’80s, the leg method in Sanda boxing system does not have a high kick, and is still similar to the low-line leg method inherent during/before the Republic of China. The Sanda wrestling techniques at that time were extracted from Baguazhang- efforts due to Cheng Style Baguazhang practitioner and Sanda pioneer, Mei Huizhi.

Kungfu Anti-Counterfeiting – Past and Present

As early as 90 years ago, a predecessor named Zhang Zhijiang dedicated extreme efforts into “kungfu anti-counterfeiting”, to strengthen feudal systems evolving with contemporary lifestyles. The scope of Zhang’s mission was even greater than that of Xu Xiaodong’s modern anti-counterfeiting incident. Zhang’s incident was the first national examination in the country in 1928.  As a military commander, Zhang understood martial arts emphasized truth in the application. Feudal kungfu is crucial in the context of the battlefield- however, a balance is required for modern application and combat sports standards.

Feudal Archers – Baguazhang/ Bajiquan

Yin Style Baguazhang and Bajiquan share the Ming Dynasty methods utilized by bowmen, ranging from infantry to imperial guards. Various routines and strike categories contain the biomechanical dynamics necessary for feudal warriors in the medieval era. The art of archery enhances cognitive focus and centering- unified with strength defending eight directions of the body.