The Yin Fu Duel – Opera Removed

The vast majority of Yin Style Baguazhang folk stories are based on Gong Baotian (Yin Fu’s disciple and not Yin Fu himself). A 2019 article documents one incident which Yin Fu encountered during his life. The story presents more realism on how Yin Fu’s Baguazhang is utilized, outside of an MMA cage and away from the tree:   

Yin Fu is very loyal. Once he was at the forefront of a friend, the two sides invited dozens of people to start a scuffle in the courtyard (undocumented reason).  During the dispute, Yin Fu suddenly realized the conflict was not for loyalty, but for the parties competing interests.  Among the enemies, there is a surname of Yang, who was also a well-known martial arts master at that time, but there is still a considerable gap between his kung fu and Yin Fu. Yin Fu became more and more fierce, and the enemy fled.  After the event, the number of people was counted. Four people were killed on the spot and more than a dozen were injured.  Later, in an attempt for revenge, Yang and his crew retaliated using six-wheeled pistols, and took a shot while Yin Fu was sleeping.  Yang went to the room where Yin Fu was asleep (supposedly a hospital) and pulled a revolver from the sleeves.  Yin Fu counter ambushed Yang, causing a big shock- resulting in Yang shooting himself. The government intervened in this matter and Yang was arrested and sentenced. 

Shanpuying – Cheng Ting Hua

The context of Cheng Ting Hua’s Baguazhang is distorted in modern kungfu culture.  Numerous 2019 articles reveal, Cheng was invited by the elites and became a member of the court’s inner guards- likely the Shanpuying (wrestling battalion equivalent to modern special forces). However, Cheng, who had just entered the palace, had not yet settled into the position… and it was during this time, he encountered the news of the invasion of the Eight-Power Allied Forces. The guards, Cheng Tinghua naturally had the obligation to protect the security of the Qing Dynasty royal family.  

Dragon Cavalry – Napoleonic Era

Dong Haichuan’s Baguazhang is renown for deceptive hands.  Yin Fu’s occupation as an imperial guard often required reconnaissance applications similar to the Napoleonic counterpart. A high-level fight IQ on the ground or the horse is essential to success.

Chinese Wrestling – Tiger Claw

Yin Style Baguazhang contains claw-like movements, many of which adapted from feudal wrestling.  The wrestling vest descends from cuffs of ancient armor. A talon-like grasp is required for clenching and controlling the leather sleeve portion of the armor- before finishing the opponent on the ground.

Spiritual Origins – The First Gun

A Buddhist silk banner dated over a thousand years ago, depicts a demon wielding the fire lance- the ancestor of every gun and cannon, ever made. The banner is the oldest depiction of a firearm in the world. Furthermore, in 808 AD, Taoist monks created gunpowder when formulating an elixir for longevity.  

Feudal Stick Method – Foundations

According to Ming warrior Yu Dazhao:  “With the stick, you can decipher the Four Books.” Hooks, knives, spears, and polearms are all the same. If you can utilize the stick efficiently, the methods of the various weapons will be successful”

The Soul Of Baguazhang – Ming Dynasty Sword Classics

In modern Baguazhang schools, the Giant Sword and Saber is often emphasized, regardless of branch or styles. In fact, many instructors today regard the sword as the soul of Baguazhang structures, in feudal times… While this theory certainly has merit, Feudal Academia is not here to play guessing games. 10 out of 10 Chinese scholars agree that the cold weapon technology of the Qing Dynasty is inherited directly from the Ming.  IRFS provides clear documentation, tracking the longsword foundation to Yu Dazhao in the era of General Qijiguang. Yu Dazhao wrote a book called “The Sword Classic”:  the techniques illustrated include the iconic  T-step/shape footwork entries of triangular point-stepping, describes the sword method as ‘running water’, a continuous striking which ‘flows with the force’, demonstrates ‘reversing the body’ and ‘heaven and earth’ usage of the longsword… last and most importantly, THE SWORD CLASSIC IS A BOOK ABOUT STICKS [aka polearms] FOR PIKEMAN OF THE ARMY!!

Dong Haichuan – KarateBender

In contemporary times with kungfu commercialization, historically accurate Baguazhang is a challenge to identify. Every now and again, someone will ponder why the Men Baozhen/ Xie Peiqi branch of Yin Style Baguazhang ‘aesthetically’ varies from mainstream Baguazhang. Some have suggested Yin Style Hard Palm looks more like KARATE then airbending as commonly depicted in the movies. The feudal breakdown by Chinese scholars can finally put this question to rest…  Karate stems from “Tang Hand”, a system which was further refined in the 19th century through the efforts of Tangshou Sakugawa.  At that time, Sakuhisa Kakuhe traveled across the ocean to study Chinese martial arts in the Qing Dynasty- improving upon the earlier Ming Dynasty “Tang Hand” rooted in Ryukyu. Sakugawa’s Beijing foundation is often credited to Dong Haichuan, the founder of Baguazhang. Sakujiu’s stick method is influenced by his military studies in Beijing City during this era.