Baguazhang Integration – Sanda 1980

Sanda Academies in China are the foundation for the majority of Chinese MMA fighters- the modern debate of “Traditional” vs modern combat sports is often out of context, lacking proper historical knowledge. Modern Sanda development in the late 20th century is primarily feudal Shaolin legwork, Baguazhang wrestling, with western Boxing fusion. Before the ’80s, the leg method in Sanda boxing system does not have a high kick, and is still similar to the low-line leg method inherent during/before the Republic of China. The Sanda wrestling techniques at that time were extracted from Baguazhang- efforts due to Cheng Style Baguazhang practitioner and Sanda pioneer, Mei Huizhi.

Baguazhang Ground Game? – Feudal Arm Bar

Grappling and throws, groundwork has strong roots in Ming Dynasty China- in the era of heavy armor and knights. Most soldiers in feudal China served as peacekeepers, subduing an opponent on the ground for capture is a necessity in certain applications. Generally, ground fighting is limited if possible during melee situations against multiple armed opponents- however necessary for security purposes or last resort from injury on the battlefield. The feudal Shaolin Arm Bar is labeled as “Straddling a Horse” technique. Liu Jin Sheng in the pic is a Shaolin officer in the Shanghai days of William E. Fairbairn. It is a modern myth Baguazhang contains minimal knowledge of ground fundamentals.