Stress Response – Vestibular Function

More times than not… the stress response is activated during modern Kungfu vs MMA challenges and goes into overdrive anytime popular kungfu interpretation examines its own feudal history (the one that is not reimagined/approved by the Chinese State Commission for Physical Culture and Sports). Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction- overwhelming dizziness and loss of balance are common in kungfu practitioners with panic and other anxiety disorders. A stressed-out vestibular system may induce fear of movement, the feeling of insecurity in a fight, and unbalanced emotions in the context of proper historical documentation. Extensive circle walking and feudal insight harmonize the interaction between stress and vestibular compensation.

Lethwei Boxing – Bajiquan

Lethwei or Burmese boxing is a full-contact combat sport from Myanmar that utilizes brutal elbow strikes along with various headbutts and clinching techniques. Lethwei is considered to be one of the most aggressive and brutal martial arts in the world- known as the Art of Nine Limbs. The unique close-range striking of Lethwei is reminiscent of those of Bajiquan, both descending from stick/polearm methods of feudal dynasties. 

Lost Tiger Fork – Yin Style Baguazhang

The Tiger Fork/Palladium is standard equipment of Imperial Guards during the Ming and Qing Dynasties- the melee cold weapon is often used in tiger hunts, military, and law enforcement applications. The Tiger Fork remains a versatile tool to this day in Asia, still utilized by armed police for control and capture. The modern fork is more humane with only two rounded prongs- the sharp center point is removed entirely. [feudal Tiger Fork technique is contained in Yin Style Bagua, most apparent in the Rooster System]

Yin Style Bagua Dragon System – Imperial Power

The YSB Dragon System is underappreciated in today’s kungfu culture, partly because Snake symbolism is often attached to Yin Fu’s personal fighting style. The popularity of the Luohan Penetrating Palms styling in most Yin Style branches is the primary reason for the ‘snake’ characteristics- snakes are a symbol of SPEARS.  The Luohan Penetrating Palm sets cater to instruments such as the short spear. It is worth noting William E. Fairbairn’s Baguazhang teacher (Cui Zhendong/disciple of Yin Fu), represented Shaolin Dragon & Tiger methods in the early 20th century. The system at the time was not labeled as ‘Baguazhang’. Dragon and Tiger symbolism in northern Shaolin styles trace back to General Qi Jiguang and Yu Dayou, renown as the Tiger and Dragon of the Ming Dynasty. The most iconic palm in mainstream Baguazhang is represented by the tiger mouth- the Shaolin stick method is represented by the Dragon… Dragons have significance to the Beiyang New Army towards the later part of Yin Fu’s career. The most prominent feature of the new army saber is the enamel ornament on the shank. The saber distinguishes the ranks of the officers and military ranks with the number of dragons/in the knives/on the knives: senior officers are sorghum Dragon pattern, five dragon claws; intermediate officers are Pingyi dragon pattern, three dragon claws; lower-level officers do not have patterns, no dragon claws. The dragon was the symbol of the imperial power of the Qing Dynasty and the symbol of the emperor. It was hoped that this new army at that time would become an important force for the maintenance of the imperial rule of the Qing Dynasty.  [Yin Style Bagua Dragon System contains officer saber methods, bayonet, cudgel, and restraint/close quarters strategy of Imperial Guards]

Long To Short Range – Bajiquan

Bajiquan is known for its elbow strikes and short-range power. Similar to Muay Thai’s “Eight Limbs”, Bajiquan uses “Eight Weapons” to strike – Feet, Knees, Hips, Body, Shoulders, Elbows, Arms and Head. It is built for close in-fighting, engaging aggressively from a longer range to short distance. 

Boxing Of Chinese Knights – Bajiquan

Bajiquan is renown for its explosive, short-range power and is iconic for its elbow and shoulder strikes- descending from the heavy armor era in feudal dynasties. Though pugilistic sports are uncommon in ancient China, Bajiquan contains boxing methods of Ming-era knights.

The Soul Of Baguazhang – Ming Dynasty Sword Classics

In modern Baguazhang schools, the Giant Sword and Saber is often emphasized, regardless of branch or styles. In fact, many instructors today regard the sword as the soul of Baguazhang structures, in feudal times… While this theory certainly has merit, Feudal Academia is not here to play guessing games. 10 out of 10 Chinese scholars agree that the cold weapon technology of the Qing Dynasty is inherited directly from the Ming.  IRFS provides clear documentation, tracking the longsword foundation to Yu Dazhao in the era of General Qijiguang. Yu Dazhao wrote a book called “The Sword Classic”:  the techniques illustrated include the iconic  T-step/shape footwork entries of triangular point-stepping, describes the sword method as ‘running water’, a continuous striking which ‘flows with the force’, demonstrates ‘reversing the body’ and ‘heaven and earth’ usage of the longsword… last and most importantly, THE SWORD CLASSIC IS A BOOK ABOUT STICKS [aka polearms] FOR PIKEMAN OF THE ARMY!!

The Practical Isn’t Pretty- General Qi Jiguang

Most Internal Martial Arts in origin, descend or are significantly influenced by Ming General Qi Jiguang, a pioneer of kungfu in medieval China.  His ancient proverb states that the “pretty is not practical and the practical is not pretty.” Feudal Scholars believe Qi Jiguang is describing YIN STYLE BAGUAZHANG- a raw historical artifact of terrifying prowess and prestige.  Many have yet to realize, feudal Baguazhang does not look like the performance-based demonstrations often represented in modern kungfu cinema.  To judge an ancient fighting art using contemporary Peking Opera-fu aesthetics guidelines- is a prime reason why there are Kungfu vs MMA discussions in modern times.