Stress Response – Vestibular Function

More times than not… the stress response is activated during modern Kungfu vs MMA challenges and goes into overdrive anytime popular kungfu interpretation examines its own feudal history (the one that is not reimagined/approved by the Chinese State Commission for Physical Culture and Sports). Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction- overwhelming dizziness and loss of balance are common in kungfu practitioners with panic and other anxiety disorders. A stressed-out vestibular system may induce fear of movement, the feeling of insecurity in a fight, and unbalanced emotions in the context of proper historical documentation. Extensive circle walking and feudal insight harmonize the interaction between stress and vestibular compensation.

Ancestors Baguazhang – Military Wrestling

The feudal wrestling techniques of Baguazhang practitioners have shifted greatly with the times. Empty-hand wrestling methods in the classical sense serve fractions of the curriculum under jurisdiction of Internal House Affairs. Qing-era wrestling battalions integrate grappling in the context of military close combat- emphasizing disarms, weapons retention/engagement, horseriding, bone strikes, locks, and alternate psychology to modern interpretation. The principles are similar to Japanese ancient jujitsu or medieval European knights in historical battlefields. 

Lethwei Boxing – Bajiquan

Lethwei or Burmese boxing is a full-contact combat sport from Myanmar that utilizes brutal elbow strikes along with various headbutts and clinching techniques. Lethwei is considered to be one of the most aggressive and brutal martial arts in the world- known as the Art of Nine Limbs. The unique close-range striking of Lethwei is reminiscent of those of Bajiquan, both descending from stick/polearm methods of feudal dynasties. 

Bazi Stick Method – Bajiquan/ Baguazhang

The method of clenching fists in Bajiquan is unlike standard boxing in origin. The four-finger curves and hollows, in a shape similar to a “palladium” or fork-like instrument. The ancients named it “Palladium Fist/Baziquan” during the Ming Dynasty. The system excels in close-in boxing, stick melee/polearm applications and shares technology similar to Yin Style Baguazhang (Phoenix Curling-In) and Escrima (Snapping Strikes). The fist hollows and clenches in intervals, or with a whip-like fashion before impact- designed for speed, rapid succession, and delivery of power with polearms or batons.

Lost Tiger Fork – Yin Style Baguazhang

The Tiger Fork/Palladium is standard equipment of Imperial Guards during the Ming and Qing Dynasties- the melee cold weapon is often used in tiger hunts, military, and law enforcement applications. The Tiger Fork remains a versatile tool to this day in Asia, still utilized by armed police for control and capture. The modern fork is more humane with only two rounded prongs- the sharp center point is removed entirely. [feudal Tiger Fork technique is contained in Yin Style Bagua, most apparent in the Rooster System]

Modern Self Defense – Principals Of The Circle

[Xu Xiaodong’s coach Mei Huizhi, demonstrates principals of the circle]

In any era, self-defense requires standards and context relevant to its environment. Feudal Baguazhang strategies nowadays are often adapted for combat sports, fitness, or holistic routes in training, to cater to the modern man.  For instance, ancient polearms/ instruments are adapted for body alignment/strength conditioning, to benefit the everyday person. Unarmed techniques are now used in conjunction with compact carry weapons of the 21st century. Mei Huizhi is a pioneer of Sanda sport in China, while remaining a dedicated practitioner of old school Baguazhang. He has integrated principals of Bagua footwork and grappling into Chinese Sanda and MMA.