Stress Response – Vestibular Function

More times than not… the stress response is activated during modern Kungfu vs MMA challenges and goes into overdrive anytime popular kungfu interpretation examines its own feudal history (the one that is not reimagined/approved by the Chinese State Commission for Physical Culture and Sports). Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction- overwhelming dizziness and loss of balance are common in kungfu practitioners with panic and other anxiety disorders. A stressed-out vestibular system may induce fear of movement, the feeling of insecurity in a fight, and unbalanced emotions in the context of proper historical documentation. Extensive circle walking and feudal insight harmonize the interaction between stress and vestibular compensation.

Lethwei Boxing – Bajiquan

Lethwei or Burmese boxing is a full-contact combat sport from Myanmar that utilizes brutal elbow strikes along with various headbutts and clinching techniques. Lethwei is considered to be one of the most aggressive and brutal martial arts in the world- known as the Art of Nine Limbs. The unique close-range striking of Lethwei is reminiscent of those of Bajiquan, both descending from stick/polearm methods of feudal dynasties. 

The Soul Of Baguazhang – Ming Dynasty Sword Classics

In modern Baguazhang schools, the Giant Sword and Saber is often emphasized, regardless of branch or styles. In fact, many instructors today regard the sword as the soul of Baguazhang structures, in feudal times… While this theory certainly has merit, Feudal Academia is not here to play guessing games. 10 out of 10 Chinese scholars agree that the cold weapon technology of the Qing Dynasty is inherited directly from the Ming.  IRFS provides clear documentation, tracking the longsword foundation to Yu Dazhao in the era of General Qijiguang. Yu Dazhao wrote a book called “The Sword Classic”:  the techniques illustrated include the iconic  T-step/shape footwork entries of triangular point-stepping, describes the sword method as ‘running water’, a continuous striking which ‘flows with the force’, demonstrates ‘reversing the body’ and ‘heaven and earth’ usage of the longsword… last and most importantly, THE SWORD CLASSIC IS A BOOK ABOUT STICKS [aka polearms] FOR PIKEMAN OF THE ARMY!!

Feudal Archers – Baguazhang/ Bajiquan

Yin Style Baguazhang and Bajiquan share the Ming Dynasty methods utilized by bowmen, ranging from infantry to imperial guards. Various routines and strike categories contain the biomechanical dynamics necessary for feudal warriors in the medieval era. The art of archery enhances cognitive focus and centering- unified with strength defending eight directions of the body.

The Golden Ratio – Martial Geometry

The golden ratio is a proportional relationship of numbers- dividing a line into two parts. The ratio of the long line to the short part is equal to the ratio of the whole line to the long section. The numerical ratio is 1.618 : 1 or 1: 0.618, which definition is that the square of the long segment is equal to the product of the full length and the short segment. As early as the sixth century BC, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras revealed there was a harmonious beauty in this segmentation state.  Refined strategy in Baguazhang training is governed by the principle of the circle and square. Feudal structures developed during the formation of new movement patterns- enhance martial geometry according to the most perfect proportions of human body mechanics.

Dong Jun – Dong Haichuan’s Ancestor

Dong Jun (1186—1233) is a famous ancestor of Dong Haichuan. The Dong family is renown for the ancient battlefield kungfu- which Baguazhang earned its reputation in feudal times. The real Dong Haichuan descended from elite military commanders who are also real people- serving the empire with great contributions to Mongolia and Beijing.  Dong Jun is the first deputy marshal and Army General of the Yuan Dynasty, in the era of Kublai Khan.  In 1232 he participated in the siege of the Battle of Beijing and died during airbending in 1233. Feudal Baguazhang masters deserve honor for their kungfu with accurate context– the modern Baguazhang sports promotions have shifted considerably from the origin systems.

Cheng Ting Hua – Ming Era Close-In Wrestling

According to Chinese Scholars, the Qing Dynasty retained the cold weapons strategy (polearms, sabers, non-firearms etc.) from the Ming Dynasty armed treatise… which would be the strategy of Feudal Shaolin. The core of all Shaolin systems is the polearm/staff- essential and the first line of defense for most armed escorts and militia without access to Chinese Gun-fu. Close-in wrestling is essential during polearm melee, with a refined/scientific approach which exists in raw lineages today. The methods descend from an era when Kungfu masters still fought in life or death situations with a medieval weapon- contrary to most modern Opera-fu (it’s also pretty and silky without the polearm). Cheng Ting Hua is at the minimum, reserves/ militia in the Qing Dynasty. Being drafted by the Empress Cixi personally during the 1900 escape from Beijing- is no easy task for the average Mcdojo in ancient China. Yin Fu is skilled at the polearms also… it is a pre-requisite for tax collecting in Inner Mongolia with the founder of Baguazhang.