Baguazhang Footwork Origins – T Square Step

Dong Haichuan’s Baguazhang footwork shares ancestry with Ming-era systems in Hebei Province, including Bajiquan. The T-step (also called T Square) is well documented in Ming General Yu Dayou’s ‘Sword Classics’, with emphasis on polearms in origin.  The reversing T step describes escaping backward, then taking advantage of an arched position in counterstrike. The T method immediately turns the back and attacks the opponent with a square geometry.  Treatise:  the t-square step can be used for regression, but also for progression; it may retreat; can be advanced in an arc, it can be rotated forward, or it can enter at a curve; Use every possible way to discover and apply the principal.

Horse Cutter – Qing Wrestling Battalions

The most elite wrestlers in Qing era reside within the royal courts, known as the Imperial Guard Wrestling Battalion.  The signature strength training/ defense instrument is the Horse Cutter in various weight and shapes [pudao/guandao styling]. Yin Style Baguazhang experts utilized this polearm for royal military examination, and in the 19th century- field duty on foot. According to Ming Dynasty treatise, the horse cutter is reserved for high ranking officers in relation to the cavalry (more common in the infantry). Standard Ming cavalry is generally prohibited from horse cutter usage on horseback… the customs continued through the Qing era of the Manchu equestrian military training.

Baguazhang Ground Game? – Feudal Arm Bar

Grappling and throws, groundwork has strong roots in Ming Dynasty China- in the era of heavy armor and knights. Most soldiers in feudal China served as peacekeepers, subduing an opponent on the ground for capture is a necessity in certain applications. Generally, ground fighting is limited if possible during melee situations against multiple armed opponents- however necessary for security purposes or last resort from injury on the battlefield. The feudal Shaolin Arm Bar is labeled as “Straddling a Horse” technique. Liu Jin Sheng in the pic is a Shaolin officer in the Shanghai days of William E. Fairbairn. It is a modern myth Baguazhang contains minimal knowledge of ground fundamentals.

The Golden Ratio – Martial Geometry

The golden ratio is a proportional relationship of numbers- dividing a line into two parts. The ratio of the long line to the short part is equal to the ratio of the whole line to the long section. The numerical ratio is 1.618 : 1 or 1: 0.618, which definition is that the square of the long segment is equal to the product of the full length and the short segment. As early as the sixth century BC, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras revealed there was a harmonious beauty in this segmentation state.  Refined strategy in Baguazhang training is governed by the principle of the circle and square. Feudal structures developed during the formation of new movement patterns- enhance martial geometry according to the most perfect proportions of human body mechanics.

The Grandmaster Motion Picture – Wong Kar-Wai

Wong Kar-wai’s 2013 film, THE GRANDMASTER, features elegant cinematography and artistry of Baguazhang. In the movie, Gong Er’s (Zhang Ziyi) father is Gong Yutian who is an elite Yin Style Baguazhang fighter. Gong Yutian’s character is inspired by Yin Fu’s (right on pic) disciple GONG BAOTIAN (left)- who served as the royal bodyguard of the Dowager Empress Cixi (middle).  The style of Baguazhang in the movie is Yin/Cheng Baguazhang Interlinking Body- characterized by smooth coiling and uncoiling actions, dynamic footwork, close-in wrestling, bone strikes, and most importantly Polearm methods of Qing era Bodyguards… An interesting note, Gong Baotian’s LUOHAN Style of Baguazhang is cross-trained by Wutan Bajiquan carrier, Liu Yun Qiao.  The Bajiquan fighter (Razor’s character) in The Grandmaster film is based on Liu Yun Qiao’s journeys.  

Cheng Ting Hua – Ming Era Close-In Wrestling

According to Chinese Scholars, the Qing Dynasty retained the cold weapons strategy (polearms, sabers, non-firearms etc.) from the Ming Dynasty armed treatise… which would be the strategy of Feudal Shaolin. The core of all Shaolin systems is the polearm/staff- essential and the first line of defense for most armed escorts and militia without access to Chinese Gun-fu. Close-in wrestling is essential during polearm melee, with a refined/scientific approach which exists in raw lineages today. The methods descend from an era when Kungfu masters still fought in life or death situations with a medieval weapon- contrary to most modern Opera-fu (it’s also pretty and silky without the polearm). Cheng Ting Hua is at the minimum, reserves/ militia in the Qing Dynasty. Being drafted by the Empress Cixi personally during the 1900 escape from Beijing- is no easy task for the average Mcdojo in ancient China. Yin Fu is skilled at the polearms also… it is a pre-requisite for tax collecting in Inner Mongolia with the founder of Baguazhang.

The Honor of Dongfang Xu – Han Muxia

The First Baguazhang motion picture ‘THE HONOR OF DONGFANG XU’ (1983) became the inspiration for Wang Kar-Wai’s ‘THE GRANDMASTER’ film (2013).  Li Junfeng’s character is based on Han Muxia, a Baguazhang expert in the early 20th century. The unarmed pugilism and martial context, against the Hercules character in the film-  is a fictional representation of factual history. China after the mid-20th century experienced the second wave of sports modifications by the Chinese government- pugilism in a sporting context is borrowed from the west.  Han Muxia’s Baguazhang context, in reality, is fighting for the war. Muxia trained the Broadsword team (actually called “pistol team”) providing the most practical big knife skills and close-in wrestling.  Modern combat sports and the battlefield always have a world of difference. [Master Li Junfeng is an old mentor and family friend of IRFS- a noble individual who stands for accurate documentation of Baguazhang history, regardless of commercial interests in the 21st century. Li has a strong connection with old Cheng Baguazhang masters, especially Sun Zhijun]

Elegant and Silky – Yin/ Cheng Interlinking Body

Often in cinema, the Baguazhang presented is elegant and silky- with a larger diameter eight step circle. The popular Baguazhang movements employ the whole body with smooth coiling and uncoiling actions, utilizing palm techniques, dynamic footwork, and close-in wrestling. In feudal era, the larger circle radius is necessary for polearm-fu against multiple opponents- a characteristic strategy of Qing footsoldiers and militia. In modern times, there are raw lineages which maintain the polearm structures in the empty-hand routines… some more so than others. According to feudal Shaolin Armed Treatise, pure Yin/Cheng artifact of Interlinking Body methods without heavy modification in modern times-  should indeed retain the polearm structures with transitions intact. Close-in wrestling integration, with the primary weapon dominant, is standard- and not the other way around. Pre- 1900s, unarmed pugilistic systems as portrayed in popular Baguazhang films would be viewed as an impractical self-defense system for urban applications. 

YSB Dragon Capturing – Shaolin Cudgel

The Dragon System training material of the He Jinbao/Xie Peiqi branch, features empty-hand applications for “Capturing Strike”. In feudal times, the primary application of the routines would emphasize the cudgel over unarmed… as demonstrated by Bruce Lee.