Lethwei Boxing – Bajiquan

Lethwei or Burmese boxing is a full-contact combat sport from Myanmar that utilizes brutal elbow strikes along with various headbutts and clinching techniques. Lethwei is considered to be one of the most aggressive and brutal martial arts in the world- known as the Art of Nine Limbs. The unique close-range striking of Lethwei is reminiscent of those of Bajiquan, both descending from stick/polearm methods of feudal dynasties. 

Long To Short Range – Bajiquan

Bajiquan is known for its elbow strikes and short-range power. Similar to Muay Thai’s “Eight Limbs”, Bajiquan uses “Eight Weapons” to strike – Feet, Knees, Hips, Body, Shoulders, Elbows, Arms and Head. It is built for close in-fighting, engaging aggressively from a longer range to short distance. 

Prince Su – Three Airbenders

Shanqi (善耆; 1866–1922; 10th), held the title Prince Su of the First Rank from 1898 to 1922, posthumously honored as Prince Suzhong of the First Rank (肅忠親王).  There are three noticeable Airbenders in the background. Eunuch bodyguards of the good prince would look like the pic. Dong Haichuan is employed by Prince Shanqi in the 19th century.

The Golden Ratio – Martial Geometry

The golden ratio is a proportional relationship of numbers- dividing a line into two parts. The ratio of the long line to the short part is equal to the ratio of the whole line to the long section. The numerical ratio is 1.618 : 1 or 1: 0.618, which definition is that the square of the long segment is equal to the product of the full length and the short segment. As early as the sixth century BC, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras revealed there was a harmonious beauty in this segmentation state.  Refined strategy in Baguazhang training is governed by the principle of the circle and square. Feudal structures developed during the formation of new movement patterns- enhance martial geometry according to the most perfect proportions of human body mechanics.

Wutan Bajiquan – Feudal Shaolin

The fight between MMA fighter Xu Xiaodong and Tai Chi master Wei Lei sent shockwaves through China.  A competition which only lasted 10 seconds- forever changed Chinese Kungfu history in contemporary times.  The punch that Xu utilized is the feudal Shaolin fist- iconic in Bajiquan.  This straight fist with the expansion of the rear arm is renown for penetrating force, with a continuous second energy upon impact.  Beijing Gongfu Jia Taijiquan 83 system also contains this style of boxing technique… Xu has earned the support of the Shaolin Temple in China, in an effort to preserve factual Chinese Kungfu- as there are too many exaggerated Tai Chi or commercial Kungfu promotions nowadays stemming from the 1928 Fitness Reform, detrimental to REAL Taijiquan, Baguazhang, or kungfu reputation. Xu is supportive of authentic Bajiquan (Shaolin), original Taijiquan (feudal Chen Longfist) and Yin Style Baguazhang (feudal Shaolin), he is great friends with some of He Jinbao’s early disciples.

Bajiquan Austin, TX – Ming Dynasty Origins

[Uncle Ma, lecturing about short-range elbows again- at the World Armed Forces Association]   Feudal Bajiquan and Beijing Chen Taijiquan descend from the same sources in the Ming Dynasty- separated in the early 20th century during the 1928 Fitness Reform. Before the 20th century, the systems are Feudal Military Shaolin. Liu Yun Qiao cross-trained Yin Style Baguazhang (orthodox penetrating palms) with Wutan Bajiquan.