Long To Short Range – Bajiquan

Bajiquan is known for its elbow strikes and short-range power. Similar to Muay Thai’s “Eight Limbs”, Bajiquan uses “Eight Weapons” to strike – Feet, Knees, Hips, Body, Shoulders, Elbows, Arms and Head. It is built for close in-fighting, engaging aggressively from a longer range to short distance. 

Bare Knuckle Boxing – Quarterstaff

Certain historians believe the unarmed structures of western boxing evolved from the quarterstaff.  The angles of the guard and strikes in that era are reminiscent of the exotic postures seen in many Kungfu styles. Modernization of boxing/empty-hand fighting has gradually altered the original polearm structures- inherent in the east and the west. [John L. Sullivan in pic]

Boxing Of Chinese Knights – Bajiquan

Bajiquan is renown for its explosive, short-range power and is iconic for its elbow and shoulder strikes- descending from the heavy armor era in feudal dynasties. Though pugilistic sports are uncommon in ancient China, Bajiquan contains boxing methods of Ming-era knights.

Baguazhang Footwork Origins – T Square Step

Dong Haichuan’s Baguazhang footwork shares ancestry with Ming-era systems in Hebei Province, including Bajiquan. The T-step (also called T Square) is well documented in Ming General Yu Dayou’s ‘Sword Classics’, with emphasis on polearms in origin.  The reversing T step describes escaping backward, then taking advantage of an arched position in counterstrike. The T method immediately turns the back and attacks the opponent with a square geometry.  Treatise:  the t-square step can be used for regression, but also for progression; it may retreat; can be advanced in an arc, it can be rotated forward, or it can enter at a curve; Use every possible way to discover and apply the principal.

Urban Strategy & Biomechanics – Practical For All Walks Of Life

By the 20th century, Internal Martial Arts became reimagined by reformers and teachers striving to preserve Chinese culture, or to strengthen the Chinese nation against foreign oppression. The martial arts context of today evolved into a nationalized project that had state backing. The feudal intent of Chinese Martial Arts is urban with biomechanics beneficial to the average professional or person. It is largely impractical for a citizen to train self-defense in preparation against unarmed Combat Sports Champions in real-world situations. The Kungfu vs MMA debate is a symptom of inaccurate historical documentation and modernized goals.

Arrows And The Array – Sword Classics

The connection of fighting systems in modern era stems from connections of the past- the Baguazhang/ Bajiquan stick and archery methods were once classified as one. The content of Ming “Sword Classic” is mainly based on the stick method, yet it incorporates the content of the arrow and the array in origin. The tactics of the archers were separated from the sword classics in later editions.

Feudal Archers – Baguazhang/ Bajiquan

Yin Style Baguazhang and Bajiquan share the Ming Dynasty methods utilized by bowmen, ranging from infantry to imperial guards. Various routines and strike categories contain the biomechanical dynamics necessary for feudal warriors in the medieval era. The art of archery enhances cognitive focus and centering- unified with strength defending eight directions of the body.