Lethwei Boxing – Bajiquan

Lethwei or Burmese boxing is a full-contact combat sport from Myanmar that utilizes brutal elbow strikes along with various headbutts and clinching techniques. Lethwei is considered to be one of the most aggressive and brutal martial arts in the world- known as the Art of Nine Limbs. The unique close-range striking of Lethwei is reminiscent of those of Bajiquan, both descending from stick/polearm methods of feudal dynasties. 

Long To Short Range – Bajiquan

Bajiquan is known for its elbow strikes and short-range power. Similar to Muay Thai’s “Eight Limbs”, Bajiquan uses “Eight Weapons” to strike – Feet, Knees, Hips, Body, Shoulders, Elbows, Arms and Head. It is built for close in-fighting, engaging aggressively from a longer range to short distance. 

Bare Knuckle Boxing – Quarterstaff

Certain historians believe the unarmed structures of western boxing evolved from the quarterstaff.  The angles of the guard and strikes in that era are reminiscent of the exotic postures seen in many Kungfu styles. Modernization of boxing/empty-hand fighting has gradually altered the original polearm structures- inherent in the east and the west. [John L. Sullivan in pic]

Baguazhang Integration – Sanda 1980

Sanda Academies in China are the foundation for the majority of Chinese MMA fighters- the modern debate of “Traditional” vs modern combat sports is often out of context, lacking proper historical knowledge. Modern Sanda development in the late 20th century is primarily feudal Shaolin legwork, Baguazhang wrestling, with western Boxing fusion. Before the ’80s, the leg method in Sanda boxing system does not have a high kick, and is still similar to the low-line leg method inherent during/before the Republic of China. The Sanda wrestling techniques at that time were extracted from Baguazhang- efforts due to Cheng Style Baguazhang practitioner and Sanda pioneer, Mei Huizhi.